In "As You Like It," which "side" did Shakespeare favor in the play's division between town and country?

In "As You Like It," which "side" did Shakespeare favor in the play's division between town and country?

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It seems fairly obvious that Shakespeare intends audiences to view the pastoral, bucolic quality of the forest as an idealized setting. Here is where all the lovers finally come together. As Orlando says when approached by Rosalind /Ganymede, "there is no clock in the forest" and this statement indicates a timelessness that allows...

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This book is a satire of the romance genre, and the author  already knows that his audience would like humor at the cost of watching agrarian pretensins and country bumpkins.

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