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Which pronouns would Alberto Yáñez, a professor from Spain, use to address or talk about the following people?   1. Referring to students Alicia and Cristina 2. Talking to Mr. Gutiérrez 3. Referring to his brother Carlos 4. Talking to Mr. and Mrs. Morán 5. Talking to his two sons 6. Referring to himself 7. Talking to his wife 8.Referring to his wife 9. Referring to himself and three friends 10. Talking to his two daughters

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The Spanish language uses twekve subject pronouns, and their use depends upon the number and gender of the subject the pronoun is replacing. For example, let’s look at the following sentences:

Alberto Yáñez is a professor from Spain. Alberto Yáñez has two sons and two daughters.

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The Spanish language uses twekve subject pronouns, and their use depends upon the number and gender of the subject the pronoun is replacing. For example, let’s look at the following sentences:

Alberto Yáñez is a professor from Spain. Alberto Yáñez has two sons and two daughters.

This is already getting repetitive, and the more we have to say about Professor Yáñez, the worse it will become. Subject pronouns reduce repetition by taking the place of subject nouns. Let’s replace the subject noun in the second sentence with its corresponding pronoun (third-person masculine singular):

Alberto Yáñez is a professor from Spain. He has two sons and two daughters.

When you’re learning a new language, you often have to learn more about your native tongue as well. Before we get to the Spanish subject pronouns, let’s review the English subject pronouns:

First Person

Singular: I

Plural: We

Second Person

Singular: You

Plural: You (all)

Third Person

Singular (masculine): He

Singular (feminine): She

Singular (neuter): It

Plural: They

First person is used when you’re talking about yourself (I, singular), or yourself and someone else (we, plural).

Second person is used when you’re talking to the subject of the sentence, such as in, “You are the best student in your class” (you, singular), or “How are you guys?” (you, plural).

Third person is used when you’re talking about someone or something other than yourself or whomever you’re speaking to. An example would be, “Harry Potter is the youngest seeker in a century.” If you wanted to use a subject pronoun instead of the subject noun, Harry Potter, you would use the third-person masculine singular: "He is the youngest seeker in a century." This sentence would not make sense if you were Harry Potter, in which case you would use the first-person singular: “I am the youngest seeker in a century.” You’re not talking to Harry Potter either, because you would have used the second-person singular: “You are the youngest seeker in a century!”

Alberto Yáñez is a professor from Spain. He has two sons and two daughters.

Going back to our example sentences, we use “he” to replace Alberto because Alberto is one person, which means we need a singular pronoun; you’re not Alberto and you’re not speaking to Alberto in this sentence, which means this is third person; and Alberto is a man, which means we need the masculine version of the third-person singular, "he."

Spanish is not terribly different when it comes to subject pronouns, though you must use a different form depending on the formality of the situation:

Spanish Subject Pronouns:

First Person

Singular: Yo

Plural (masculine): Nosotros

Plural (feminine): Nosotras

Second Person

Singular (informal, masculine or feminine): Tú

Singular (formal, masculine or feminine): Usted

Plural (informal, masculine): Vosotros

Plural (informal, feminine): Vosotras

Plural (formal, masculine or feminine): Ustedes

Third Person

Singular (masculine): Él

Singular (feminine): Ella

Plural (masculine): Ellos

Plural (feminine): Ellas

Notes and exceptions:

Vosotros/as is not widely used in Latin America, which instead uses ustedes for both formal and informal situations. It is widely used in Spain. Because your homework specifically notes that Alberto Yáñez is "from Spain," it's a good idea to use vosotros/vosotras.

When talking about a mixed-gender group, use the masculine pronoun, even if you’re referring to a group of ten girls and one boy. Language isn't always fair.

Usted and ustedes are second-person pronouns but function in sentences like third-person pronouns (meaning that when you conjugate the corresponding verb, the verb takes the third-person form). Defer to your teacher’s preferences.

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1. To refer to the students, he would likely use "ellas."

2. If he is friends with Mr. Gutiérrez, he would use "tú." If he is not familiar with him, he would use "Ud."

3. Referring to his brother Carlos, he would likely use "él."

4. Speaking to Mr. and Mrs. Morán, he would use "Uds" if he is not on familiar terms with them. If he is on familiar terms with them, he would use "vosotros."

5. Speaking to his two sons, he would use "vosotros," the plural familiar masculine form of "you."

6. Speaking of himself, he would use "yo."

7. Talking to his wife, he would use "tú."

8. Referring to his wife, he would use "ella."

9. Referring to himself and three friends, he would use "nosotros."

10. Talking to his two daughters, he would use "vosotras."

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