The Canterbury Tales Questions and Answers
by Geoffrey Chaucer

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Which pilgrims does Chaucer idealize in The Canterbury Tales

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Chaucer is critical of most of the pilgrims introduced in "The General Prologue" to his Canterbury Tales. "Idealized" is a strong word, implying that Chaucer sees the character as the perfect embodiment of his or her role in society and maybe even exaggerates the goodness of the character. That said, only the Knight and the Parson are really "idealized" in the Prologue.

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