Which part of The Giver shows the absence of war, hatred, and rudeness?

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For most of the beginning of Lowry's The Giverthere is an absence of war, hatred, and rudeness because the reader learns about the rules of Jonas 's community. The rules demand strict adherence to being polite and respecting oneself as well as others. For example, when Asher is...

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For most of the beginning of Lowry's The Giverthere is an absence of war, hatred, and rudeness because the reader learns about the rules of Jonas's community. The rules demand strict adherence to being polite and respecting oneself as well as others. For example, when Asher is late to school in chapter one, he is expected to apologize to his class. The class then tells him that they accept his apology in unison. This shows that community members are held to a high standard of politeness at all times.

The times when everyone seems to be happy and united are when the community holds unscheduled holidays and during the annual two-day ceremonies held each December. The two-day ceremonies held each December are the community's celebrations for the children as they grow, progress, and accept more responsibilities in their lives. This is an exciting time because each group of children receives a new responsibility as well as a certain type of personal freedom. For example, children turning nine receive bicycles which allow them more travel possibilities along with maintenance responsibilities. Enthusiastic children are happy to assume more freedom and responsibility with each year because it signifies their growth and increasing value to the community. No one thinks about war, or hate, or being rude during the ceremonies or holidays. 

Lily's ceremony is found in chapter six, while the Ceremony of Twelve is found in chapter seven. Jonas's selection as the Receiver-in-training is in chapter eight. Other than the Chief Elder causing some anxiety for Jonas and the audience while his whole group receives assignments and he stands there awkwardly, there isn't any talk or display of war, hatred or rudeness. Again, people in the community are conditioned to show respect and control their behavior at all times. 

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