Which one is true about Robert Frost's poetry, "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening?"   Which one is true 1. Unconventional syntax 2. Irregular spelling 3. Addressing directly to a...

 

Which one is true about Robert Frost's poetry, "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening?"

 

Which one is true

1. Unconventional syntax

2. Irregular spelling

3. Addressing directly to a specified listener

4. Regular rhyme scheme with metrical pattern

 

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.
Expert Answers
rmhope eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The correct answer is 4) regular rhyme scheme with metrical pattern. The poem contains no unconventional syntax, that is, using words or sentence structure in unusual ways. Nor does it have irregular spelling. The narrator of the poem does not address anyone overtly; instead, he seems to be thinking or reflecting on his situation to himself.

The rhyme scheme of the poem is very regular. In each stanza the first two and fourth lines rhyme. While the third line doesn't rhyme with any of the lines within the stanza, it rhymes with the first, second, and fourth lines of the following stanza. This is known as an interlocking rhyme scheme. In the final stanza, all four lines rhyme. Rhyme schemes are expressed with letters, and assigning letters to the lines in this poem creates a scheme of aaba bbcb ccdc dddd.

The rhythm of the words creates a steady metrical pattern known as iambic. In this pattern, every other syllable is stressed, beginning with the second syllable. This poem is completely consistent in its rhythm, as you will be able to see if you do a scansion of the poem. In a scansion, you assign each syllable of the poem either a dot (for an unstressed syllable) or a dash (for a stressed syllable). A scansion of this poem reveals a perfect dot-dash-dot-dash pattern. Each line is also the same length, containing eight syllables, or four two-syllable feet. This pattern is called iambic pentameter.

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

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