Which of Hamlet's seven soliloquies is most important to the development of both the character and the plot?

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Act 1, Scene 2. "O, that this too too sullied flesh would melt..."

Hamlet is fed up with the world and everybody in it. He sounds a little suicidal. He's grieving over his father's death, which he doesn't yet know was murder. He's angry with his mother, Gertrude, and his uncle, Claudius, and appalled that they got married—and, if that isn't bad enough, that they got married so soon after his father's death. He's torturing himself with how great his father was, how good things used to be between his father and his mother, and his mother's "incestuous" relationship with his uncle who is nowhere near as great as his father was.

This is Hamlet's first soliloquy. This soliloquy is character exposition, not character development, and it has nothing to do with the plot of the play.

"It is not, nor it cannot come to, good" (1.2.161)

Along with "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" (1.4.99—which is often attributed to Hamlet, but is actually is spoken by Marcellus), and "My father's spirit in...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 2119 words.)

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