illustration of the Ancient Mariner in the ocean with an albatross tied around his neck

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Which literary devices does the poet use to emphasize the theme of the supernatural?

In Part I stanza 11, the speaker describes a ferocious storm that jostled his ship. And now the STORM-BLAST came, and he was tyrannous and strong: He struck with his o'ertaking wings, and chased us south along. The storm is given the pronoun "he" instead of it, as if it is a living being. The storm is being compared to some kind of intimidating bird that chases the ship with his "o'ertaking wings." This comparison creates a supernatural feel because the storm seems as though it is a sentient being that can think and strategize.

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The poet uses many metaphors and personification to emphasize the theme of the supernatural. In Part I stanza 11, the speaker describes a ferocious storm that jostled his ship.

And now the STORM-BLAST came, and he
Was tyrannous and strong:
He struck with his o'ertaking wings,
And chased us south...

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The poet uses many metaphors and personification to emphasize the theme of the supernatural. In Part I stanza 11, the speaker describes a ferocious storm that jostled his ship.

And now the STORM-BLAST came, and he
Was tyrannous and strong:
He struck with his o'ertaking wings,
And chased us south along.
The storm is given the pronoun "he" instead of it, as if it is a living being. The storm is being compared to some kind of intimidating bird that chases the ship with his "o'ertaking wings." This comparison creates a supernatural feel because the storm seems as though it is a sentient being that can think and strategize.
Personification is also used when speaking about the moon.
The moving Moon went up the sky,
And no where did abide:
Softly she was going up,
And a star or two beside—
Her beams bemocked the sultry main,
Like April hoar-frost spread;
The moon is also given a living pronoun, "she," and the moon moves and does not "abide" and her moon beams harassed the main mast of the ship, spreading down the mast, like a frost in April. The speaker describes the moon as if it is a sinister entity creeping down the mast of the ship.
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