In Macbeth, which king possesses the "king-becoming graces" mentioned by Malcolm in Act 4, scene3, lines 104 to 106?MALCOLM: 'But I have none: the king-becoming graces, As justice, verity,...

In Macbeth, which king possesses the "king-becoming graces" mentioned by Malcolm in Act 4, scene3, lines 104 to 106?

MALCOLM: 
'But I have none: the king-becoming graces, 
As justice, verity, temperance, stableness, 
Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness, 
Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude, 
I have no relish of them, but abound 
In the division of each several crime, 
Acting it many ways. Nay, had I power, I should 
Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell, 
Uproar the universal peace, confound 
All unity on earth. '

Kings:

Macbeth

Banquo

Malcolm

Macduff

Duncan

Donalbain

Expert Answers
Susan Hurn eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In the passage, Malcolm is not referring to a particular king; he is naming all the characteristics that a good king must possess. Within the context of the play, they would most accurately describe King Duncan, whom Macbeth had murdered. Even as he prepares to kill Duncan, Macbeth recognizes what an excellent king Duncan is. Again, in reference to the list, Banquo, Malcolm, Macduff, and Donalbain are not kings. Malcolm is, however, the rightful heir to the throne following his father Duncan's death.

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Macbeth

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