Which key parts in "The Great Gatsby" does Fitzgerald show the Upper Classes as being immoral and/or exploitatitive?I have a few ideas such as when Daisy and Tom don't attend Gatsby's funeral after...

Which key parts in "The Great Gatsby" does Fitzgerald show the Upper Classes as being immoral and/or exploitatitive?

I have a few ideas such as when Daisy and Tom don't attend Gatsby's funeral after letting him take the blame.

However, I was looking for some more. Also, I need to quote actual techniques that Fitzgerald uses in relation to the quetion.

Any ideas would be much appreciated!

Thanks :)

Asked on by tommy95

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Examples of immorality in the upper classes can be found throughout The Great Gatsby, from the first chapter to the last.

One of the most poignant isolated examples comes near the novel’s end when Nick meets Tom and asks him if he was the one that toldWilsonwhere to find Gatsby. Tom is unapologetic when he explains thatWilsonwould have killed him right then and there if he didn’t send him to Gatsby’s house. Tom realizes that this act directly led to a man’s death but he feels not responsibility. The immorality here can be seen on a few levels – first, Tom knows that it was Daisy that killed Myrtle, not Gatsby, yet he does not tellWilsonthis. Second, Tom is acting on completely selfish motives, sacrificing the life of an innocent man to save his own.

Tom also exploitsWilsonrather thoroughly in the novel, stringing him along regarding money and work while carrying on an affair withWilson’s wife. This relationship is a good place to look for direct quotations regarding exploitation.

The morally central relationship in this novel is also an example of immorality. Daisy and Gatsby are involved in the beginnings of an adulterous affair (like Tom and Myrtle), and the relationship is made more dubious by the pair’s insistence that it is based on “true love” and is therefore morally acceptable. This justification does not change the fact that Tom is being exploited as a result of this relationship.

 These are not the only examples of immorality and exploitation in the novel, but they are "key" examples. 

Sources:

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