Are #1 and #2 true of the Second Great Awakening? I think they are. It had its greatest effect in cities on the eastern seaboard. It was led by a coalition of Catholic, Episcopal, and...

Are #1 and #2 true of the Second Great Awakening? I think they are.

  1. It had its greatest effect in cities on the eastern seaboard.
  2. It was led by a coalition of Catholic, Episcopal, and Congregationalist leaders concerned about the decline of religion in public life.
  3. It helped stimulate antebellum reform movements.
  4. It was quickly overshadowed by the coming of the Civil War
  5. It primarily affected poor settlers along the southwestern frontier.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I do not believe that you are right about #1 or #2 being the right answer.  The best of these answers is actually #3.  The two that you mention have some basis in truth, but are not really true.

The Second Great Awakening did begin in New England, but its greatest impact was more in rural areas.  For example, the best-known area that was affected was the "burned-over district" in upstate New York.  It was led by people concerned about a decline in religiosity, but they were not typically leaders from "old-line" churches like the ones in #2.  Instead, the Awakening was led by individual preachers like Charles Grandison Finney who were not leaders and who were not part of the more staid religious sects.

#3 is correct because many of the reform movements like abolition and temperance came out of this revival movement.  Finney himself, for example, was an abolitionist.  The Second Great Awakening stressed the idea of human perfectibility and this stress inspired people to try to perfect society as well as individuals.

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