Which of the following best describes the errors in sentence?Being aware of the literary uses of houses, makes us more effective readers, readers who descriptions appeal to, who see beyond surface...

Which of the following best describes the errors in sentence?Being aware of the literary uses of houses, makes us more effective readers, readers who descriptions appeal to, who see beyond surface events, and who grasp the whole vision of a literary work. A comma is incorrectly inserted between the subject and main verb The wrong case form of the relative pronoun is used. A comma splice occurs. Two of these errors occur but not all three.
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Lorraine Caplan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Allow me to explain this to you, rather than just giving you the answer to the question.  The subject of the sentence is "Being aware of the literary uses of houses."  The verb in the sentence is "makes."  Now, if we were to place a comma between the subject and verb in every sentence, we would have sentence like this:

John, walked down the street.

Maria and James, had an argument.

How many sentences have you seen that look like that?

Now, let's look at "who" and "whom."  We use "who" when we want a subject in a sentence, for example, "Who had the highest score?"  But when we need an object, we need to use "whom," as in "Do not ask for whom the bells toll."  Whenever we have a preposition such as "for," "with," or "to," we need "whom" as an object.  This gets tricky when we end a clause with a preposition because we have to look at the word order more carefully.  Here is an example:

The people whom I like to speak to are polite and  intelligent.

Do you see how there is a "to" at the end of that phrase?  That "to" is a preposition, and it needs "whom."

A comma splice is a situation wherein someone has tried to glue two separate sentences together with a comma. But the comma, of course, is the wrong glue.  To have a comma splice, you need two independent clauses with a comma in-between.  Here are some examples of comma splices:

Roses are red, violets are blue.

I made meat loaf for dinner, I cleaned up quickly.

Do you think there is anything like that in your sentence?

I hope this helps you answer the question!