Which conflicts are resolved and which remain open in A Raisin in the Sun?

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Conflicts Resolved: Lena and her family will move into their larger, more comfortable home in the white neighborhood of Clybourne Park. Ruth and Walter Jr.'s relationship also seems to be healed now that Walter Jr. has a new outlook on life and Ruth will be moving into a newer...

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Conflicts Resolved: Lena and her family will move into their larger, more comfortable home in the white neighborhood of Clybourne Park. Ruth and Walter Jr.'s relationship also seems to be healed now that Walter Jr. has a new outlook on life and Ruth will be moving into a newer home. Walter Jr.'s self-hatred and depression have also come to an end now that he has decided to do the right thing by not selling Lena's home to Mr. Lindner.

Unresolved Conflicts: Hansberry leaves the plight and future of the Younger family unresolved at the end of the play. The audience does not know if the Younger family enjoys their new life in the white neighborhood or suffers from discrimination and threats of violence. Beneatha's conflicts are also left unresolved, as the audience is left to wonder about whether or not she decides to move to Africa with Joseph Asagai or continues to date George Murchison. The audience is also left to wonder if Walter Jr. finds a fulfilling job that will allow the Youngers to stay in their new home in Clybourne Park.

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Conflicts resolved: Mama gets her house and a larger space for her growing family. Walter, by turning down Mr. Linder's check, becomes a man in his family's eyes--especially in his son's eyes, which is why he changes his mind. Beneatha seems to have a worthwhile direction to her life by her consideration of going to Africa to work.  Ruth is proud of her husband and feels for once that her children will be in a better place with the move out of the apartment.

Conflicts unresolved: The audience never knows if Willie ever gets punished for stealing the Youngers' money, or if Walter finds a job that makes him feel worthwhile and significant. Similarly, since Beneatha does shift from one interest to another, the audience does not know for sure that she really sticks with her new goals.  Finally, Hansberry leaves it wide open as to how the Youngers will fare in the unwelcoming white neighborhood.

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