Which characters view the universe in a Romantic way and which view it in a classical way in Arcadia?

Arcadia contains both characters who see the world romantically and classically. Though many of the characters display characteristics of both, usually each lays heavily on one side of the argument. Characters that view the world classically include Thomasina, Lady Croom, Hannah, and Valentine. Romantic characters include Richard Noakes and Bernard.

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Tom Stoppard's play Arcadiapositions the conflicting viewpoints of classicism and Romanticism through the characters, presenting the differences between the intellectual and the emotional and order versus disorder but also displaying that these ideas can co-exist.

Classical characters include the following:

Thomasina, though she has characteristics of both the...

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Tom Stoppard's play Arcadia positions the conflicting viewpoints of classicism and Romanticism through the characters, presenting the differences between the intellectual and the emotional and order versus disorder but also displaying that these ideas can co-exist.

Classical characters include the following:

Thomasina, though she has characteristics of both the classical and the Romantic, leans heavily on the side of the classical. Thomasina understands thermodynamics at only thirteen years of age.

Hannah is a researcher who relies on reason rather than emotion. She states that the Romantic era was a "sham," and she prefers the garden's original classical design to the gothic remodel made by Noakes.

Lady Croom laments the changes being made to her classical garden by Mr. Noakes but allows them to happen anyway.

Valentine is a mathematician who explains complicated ideas to other characters in the play. He is very passionate about progress in the sciences.

Romantic characters include the following:

Richard Noakes, with his gothic remodeling plans for the garden, embodies a counter response to the classical by transforming the formerly orderly classic gardens.

Bernard believes in following instinct rather than scientific data, and he uses this to drive his theory that Byron killed Chater. This is in opposition to Hannah, who relies on facts. Bernard, consequently, is embarrassed when he learns his theory is incorrect.

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