Which characters have the courage to break society's code of ethics in To Kill a Mockingbird? Explain.

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The most prominent character in Maycomb's community to break society's code of ethics isAtticus Finch , who valiantly defends a black man named Tom Robinson in front of the prejudiced jury and community. In Maycomb's racist, segregated society, which abides by Jim Crow laws, Atticus's defense of Tom Robinson...

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The most prominent character in Maycomb's community to break society's code of ethics is Atticus Finch, who valiantly defends a black man named Tom Robinson in front of the prejudiced jury and community. In Maycomb's racist, segregated society, which abides by Jim Crow laws, Atticus's defense of Tom Robinson is considered taboo and he is highly criticized for his decision.

Dolphus Raymond is another character who breaks Maycomb's prejudiced social code. Unlike his racist neighbors, Dolphus Raymond openly associates with black people and even has several bi-racial children. In order to avoid reoccurring conflicts with his neighbors, Dolphus feigns alcoholism by sipping Coca-Cola from a paper bag.

Mayella Ewell also breaks Maycomb's strict social code forbidding relations with black people by tempting Tom Robinson. Unfortunately, Mayella's father witnessed her kissing Tom Robinson and proceeded to beat her. Mayella then falsely accused Tom Robinson of assaulting and raping her in order to avoid embarrassment and criticism from the community.

One could also say that Mr. and Mrs. Radley break Maycomb's code of ethics by refusing to socialize with their neighbors and choosing to remain indoors at all times. They are viewed with suspicion and contempt because of their abnormal lifestyle and unfriendly, reclusive nature.

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Dolphus Raymond may be the best example of a character showing the courage to break Maycomb society's code of ethic. Raymond is a wealthy white man who owns land along the river and who hails from an old Maycomb family. The night before he was to be married, Dolphus's fiance killed herself after finding out that he had a Negro mistress. After Dolphus moves in with his mistress and they bear "mixed chillun'," the people of Maycomb become convinced that he is mentally unstable and a drunkard. But Dolphus sees things more clearly than most people, and he chooses to live his life in a mostly-black world because he cries

"... about the simple hell people give other people--without even thinking. Cry about the hell white people give colored folks, without even stopping to think that they're people, too."  (Chapter 20

Atticus, of course, breaks many moral codes when he agrees to defend Tom Robinson, a black man accused of raping a white woman. Atticus knows that this decision will lose him friends, make new enemies, and perhaps even endanger the lives of his family. But Atticus's conscience does not allow him to consider a way out. More importantly,

"... do you think I could face my children otherwise?"  (Chapter 9)

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Atticus Finch demonstrates the courage to break his prejudiced society's code of ethics by valiantly defending a black man in court. Atticus's defense of Tom Robinson draws criticism from his racist neighbors, who disagree with his decision to break their society's code of ethics by championing racial equality and justice. Maycomb's racist community subscribes to Jim Crow laws that discriminate against black people and they do not believe that black citizens should be treated equally. Despite the enormous amount of social pressure from the community, Atticus follows his conscience and defends Tom Robinson to the best of his ability.

Dolphus Raymond is another character who demonstrates courage by breaking society's code of ethics. Despite being a wealthy white citizen, Dolphus Raymond engages in taboo behavior by publicly associating with black people, engaging in an affair with a black mistress at one point in his life, and having several bi-racial children. However, Dolphus Raymond feigns alcoholism to avoid conflict with his neighbors for his non-traditional, taboo lifestyle and continues to interact with black people.

Sheriff Tate is another person who breaks society's code of ethics in order to protect the reclusive Boo Radley. Sheriff Tate decides to do the right thing and protect Boo Radley from the public limelight by refusing to inform the community about his heroics and claiming that Bob Ewell fell on his own knife.

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A great example of someone who breaks society's code of ethics is Dolphus Raymond. Though a white man from a respectable family he has a black mistress by whom he's fathered a number of mixed-race children. At that time and in that place the very idea of sexual relations between the races was considered scandalous. But Dolphus gets a pass because of his good breeding. Most people write off his behavior as eccentric, the kind of behavior one would expect from someone of his class.

Dolphus's unusual behavior is also indulged due to his perceived alcoholism. In actual fact, however, he isn't really an alcoholic at all; he's just pretending to be a drunk to provide a ready-made excuse for his strange behavior. Even so, Dolphus's decision to leave behind white society and live among Maycomb's African-Americans is a clear breach of the prevailing system of ethics, and a very courageous one at that.

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This is a great question. There are only a few people in To Kill a Mockingbird who will risk breaking the norms of society. The most obvious person is Atticus. He is the person who embodies courage more than anyone else in the book. 

Right from the beginning of the Tom Robinson trial, Atticus knows that he is going to lose. He also knows that his family will be put through hardships on account of his defending Tom Robinson. Even though he knows that these things will take place, he will try his best. 

He believes so deeply that this is the right course of action that he will even risk his life. This comes out at the jail. Atticus risks his life in front of a mob. 

Here is a telling quote about Atticus's courage:

“Because I could never ask you to mind me again. Scout, simply by the nature of the work, every lawyer gets at least one case in his lifetime that affects him personally. This one’s mine, I guess. You might hear some ugly talk about it at school, but do one thing for me if you will: you just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t you let ‘em get your goat. Try fighting with your head for a change... it’s a good one, even if it does resist learning.”

Apart from Atticus, there are others who will go against the norms of society. They are people like Miss Maudie, Heck Tate, and Judge Taylor. 

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Though many of the characters in the novel show a special type of courage by their actions, some of them border on foolishness. Atticus accepts Judge Taylor's demand that he defend Tom Robinson, even though Atticus knows it may bring problems for his family and that Tom will still be found guilty.

"... I'd hoped to get through life without a case of this kind."  (Chapter 9)

Calpurnia takes Jem and Scout to her church, a bold move considering that Maycomb's code of segregation forbids such social mixing of the races. Cal does this mostly out of convenience, but she is also looking forward to showing off her employer's children. One of the wealthiest men in town, Dolphus Raymond prefers living with his African American mistress, and he becomes one of the most ostracized men in town because of it. Mrs. Dubose shows "real courage" when she decides to die unaddicted to the morphine that deadens her pain, but it becomes a difficult and even more painful time for her. Tom Robinson's kindheartedness eventually leads to his death when he decides to help Mayella Ewell because "I felt right sorry for her." Sheriff Tate risks his job at the end of the story when he decides to falsify his report, calling Bob Ewell's death self-inflicted so the real killer, Boo Radley, won't have to face the possibility of standing trial.

"... taking the one man who's done you and this town a great service an' draggin' him with his shy ways into the limelight--to me, that's a sin."  (Chapter 30)

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