Which character faces the biggest miscommunication and/or deception conflict in Part One of To Kill a Mockingbird?I need two quotes that show how a character in part one faces...

Which character faces the biggest miscommunication and/or deception conflict in Part One of To Kill a Mockingbird?

I need two quotes that show how a character in part one faces miscommunication/deception.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Boo Radley certainly fits this description, but probably the best quotations to be found concern Scout's teacher, Miss Caroline. A newcomer to Maycomb, Caroline Fisher is a beautiful young woman, fresh out of college. Her appearance is a breath of fresh air:

     She had bright auburn hair, pink cheeks, and wore crimson fingernail polish. She also wore high-heeled pumps and a red-and-white-striped dress. She looked and smelled like a peppermint drop. She boarded in Miss Maudie's upstairs front room, and when Miss Maudie introduced us to her, Jem was in a haze for days.  (Chapter 2)

But Miss Caroline's appearance doesn't win her first graders over, and her inexperience as a teacher shows immediately. She fails to recognize that Scout's reading and writing skills are an asset instead of a hindrance, and she punishes Scout when Scout tries to explain why Walter Cunningham Jr. has no lunch money. By lunch time, Miss Caroline has already lost the battle, slumping into her chair with her head buried

... in her arms. Had her conduct been more friendly toward me, I would have felt sorry for her. She was a pretty little thing.  (Chapter 2)

By the end of the day, Scout wants to quit school and be taught at home, just as Atticus had been. But Atticus wants his children to receive a proper public education, and he convinces Scout to return the next day. He also gives her a lesson in tolerance, explaining that Miss Caroline's inexperience in both teaching and in the ways of Maycomb are things that will come to her in time.

"You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view--until you climb into his skin and walk around in it."  (Chapter 3)

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