In "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?," what is it about Connie that attracts Arnold Friend to her?

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Arnold is attracted to Connie's beauty and the innocence of her youth. As the author outlines at the beginning of the story, Connie has the type of long, dark blonde hair that attracts admiring looks—looks which, at the age of 15, she is becoming increasingly aware of. When she goes...

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Arnold is attracted to Connie's beauty and the innocence of her youth. As the author outlines at the beginning of the story, Connie has the type of long, dark blonde hair that attracts admiring looks—looks which, at the age of 15, she is becoming increasingly aware of. When she goes out to the mall with her friends, for example, the author states that she becomes a completely different person than who she is at home: "her mouth, which was pale and smirking most of the time, but bright and pink on these evenings out."

As an older man—Arnold tells Connie he is 18, but Connie thinks he is closer to 30—Arnold knows that she is putting on an act and that he can manipulate and scare her to come with him. When he states,

Yes, I'm your lover. You don't know what that is but you will . . . I'm always nice at first, the first time. I'll hold you so tight you won't think you have to try to get away or pretend anything because you'll know you can't. And I'll come inside you where it's all secret and you'll give in to me and you'll love me.

It not only becomes obvious he has a psychotic urge to destroy her innocence, but that he has taken the time to choose his victim—"I know that too. I know all about you."

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Connie is an attractive young woman who is beginning to understand the power of her sexuality. She is obsessed with her looks and how she appears to others, and she is blessed with "long dark blond hair that drew anyone's eye to it." Connie is on the cusp of womanhood, so "her walk . . . could be childlike and bobbing, or languid enough to make anyone think she was hearing music in her head."

At the same time, Connie is in the common teen phase of separating herself from her parents. She argues with her mother and sneaks around with boys, using the cover story that she is with her girlfriends.

Because she is interested in the opposite sex and willing to keep her actions secret from her family, she is attractive to a predator like Arnold Friend. He knows that she is inexperienced but somewhat willing (until she gets in over her head). Connie will not be difficult to take advantage of, and Arnold Friend recognizes that.

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Arnold Friend, of course, finds her attractive.  Connie is a beautiful teenager.  However, Arnold also knows that Connie is vain and that she can be manipulated by using her vanity to lure her, which he does.  He can sense that this is her main weakness, one that he can use to get to her.  Unfortunately, Connie does realize that the vanity she has will be part of what causes her eventual death at the hands of Arnold Friend.  He is able to easily get "into her head" once he gets into the house.  He has her paralyzed with fear.  The way he words what he is telling her is "guru-like," meaning it is almost as if he is her master and she is his follower.  He coaxes her at times, almost like one would coax a dog to follow one out of a doorway.  It is very creepy and extremely frightening for the reader!  

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