Where was Oliver taken in Oliver Twist?

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Oliver was taken to Fagin’s den in London.

Oliver actually gets taken a lot of places throughout the book.  He is taken from the workhouse to the undertaker, where he is supposed to be apprenticed.  When he runs away, he is taken by Dodger to Fagin.  He is taken home...

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Oliver was taken to Fagin’s den in London.

Oliver actually gets taken a lot of places throughout the book.  He is taken from the workhouse to the undertaker, where he is supposed to be apprenticed.  When he runs away, he is taken by Dodger to Fagin.  He is taken home by Brownlow, then taken back to Fagin, and then taken to Brownlow’s house to rob it by Sikes.

The most significant taking of Oliver is when Dodger takes him to London.  Oliver has no idea what he is in for.  Dodger tells him that he has a friend who can take him in.

This unexpected offer of shelter was too tempting to be resisted; especially as it was immediately followed up, by the assurance that the old gentleman referred to, would doubtless provide Oliver with a comfortable place, without loss of time. (Ch. 8)

Fagin is not what Oliver expected.  It turns out he is not just a man who looks kindly after little boys.  He has plenty of little boys in his employ, but he uses them as pickpockets.  Oliver has no idea at first.   He thinks that the boys make their own handkerchiefs and pocketbooks.  The first time he is used to steal something, he gets caught.  Fortunately, Brownlow feels sorry for him and takes him home.

Oliver would have been in a great situation with Brownlow, but Fagin had other ideas.  Oliver’s half-brother Monks had asked Fagin to make a thief of Oliver.   This would make him unrespectable.  Monks is not thrilled that Fagin does not succeed.

"I tell you again, it was badly planned. Why not have kept him here among the rest, and made a sneaking, snivelling pickpocket of him at once?" (Ch. 26)

Oliver is innately good, and it seems that no matter what circumstances he ends up in, this will not change.  Fagin is unable to corrupt him.  Eventually, he goes back to Brownlow and the secret of his parentage, which Monks did not want anyone to know, is revealed.

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