Where is the thesis in the biography Hamilton by Ron Chernow?

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One of Ron Chernow 's intentions in writing his biography of Hamilton is to show the dramatic life of the real Hamilton. Hamilton had many brilliantly innovative ideas in the early American government. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, he advocated the federal assumption of debt and the promotion...

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One of Ron Chernow's intentions in writing his biography of Hamilton is to show the dramatic life of the real Hamilton. Hamilton had many brilliantly innovative ideas in the early American government. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, he advocated the federal assumption of debt and the promotion of domestic industry. He is best known for these ideas, but behind his ideas lies the story of a fascinating man. As Chernow writes, "Drama shadowed his footsteps" (page 41). In addition, Chernow contends that so many of Hamilton's ideas, including his authorship of The Federalist Papers and his establishment of the Bank of New York, were innovative for the time and laid the foundation for the modern America.  The thesis can be found in the Prologue, in which Chernow writes, "In all probability, Alexander Hamilton is the foremost figure in American history who never attained the presidency, yet he probably had a much deeper and more lasting impact than many who did."

Chernow establishes Hamilton's legacy through presenting the details of each stage of Hamilton's life. As Chernow writes, Hamilton's story is in some ways the story of the American Dream. Hamilton was the son of a woman who had left her abusive husband in the Caribbean without a formal divorce, meaning that all her future children, including Alexander, would be illegitimate. Hamilton, born in the West Indies, won a scholarship to what is now Columbia University in New York. He went on to fight alongside George Washington with the commitment and zeal that characterized each part of his life, and he had a meteoric rise in the government of the early American Republic, as well as a startling demise in the duel with Aaron Burr. Chernow's work goes back to the historical record to present Hamilton's real story, separate from myth, and to present the idea that his legacy is greater than that of many of our Presidents. 

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