Where does it talk about drugs in the book Always Running?

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Always Running is the memoir of Luis J. Rodriguez about his life among gang members in Los Angeles. Because of the topic material, drugs are a frequent topic throughout the book. There are a few specific places where they're mentioned that are interesting.

Rodriguez explains that "my teen years were...

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Always Running is the memoir of Luis J. Rodriguez about his life among gang members in Los Angeles. Because of the topic material, drugs are a frequent topic throughout the book. There are a few specific places where they're mentioned that are interesting.

Rodriguez explains that "my teen years were ones of drugs, shootings and beatings, and arrests" because that explains to the reader what the book will be about. It's clear that he had lots of exposure to drugs; people around him both used drugs and sold drugs. This had major consequences on their lives. As he says, "By the time I turned years old, 25 of my friends had been killed by rival gangs, police, drugs, car crashes, and suicides."

Later he explains why so many people turned to drugs. He talks about the experience of a 10-year-old boy in Humboldt Park where it was possible to make up to $100 per day by acting as a lookout for drug dealers. Even when people aren't doing drugs, they're still part of the drug industry. As he says, "The drug trade is business. It's capitalism."

This business is something that colors a great deal of Rodriguez's time in East Los Angeles.

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Drugs play a prominent role in the memoir Always Running by Luis Rodriguez. Many of the people described in the memoir use, sell, and are often surrounded by hardcore junkies. The author is exposed to drugs from a very young age. He sniffs aerosol sprays and glue and later uses marijuana, pills, and heroin. Rodriguez addresses the drug trade early in his memoir, explaining that selling drugs is a form of underground economy that emerges in poorer neighborhoods, one which recruits even children to participate as paid lookouts. Rodriguez describes almost dying from a drug overdose, as so many of the friends he had growing up did. Rodriguez shows how drugs also function as a form of escapism, allowing many young people to escape the boredom or poverty of their environments.

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