Where is there a synecdoche in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

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Synecdoche is a literary device in which a part represents a whole or a whole represents a part. See the link below for a webpage describing both kinds of synecdoche as well as their relationship to similar devices, like metonymy.

Though there are many interesting synecdoche examples from Wuthering Heights already listed, I found a couple more toward the middle of the novel. Here are two within the same sentence in chapter 11:

"No, I was told the curate should have his teeth dashed down his throat, if he stepped over the threshold . . . "

In the first part of the sentence, the curate's teeth stand for his entire body. The line is a threat of punishment meant to indicate that the curate may suffer bodily harm. The second part of the sentence uses the threshold to stand for the entire home. "Cross the threshold" is another way of saying "enter the home."

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A synecdoche is a figure of speech in which one part of an entity is made to stand for or represent the whole. For example, "he had a hand in fixing the house" would be a classic example of a synecdoche. The hypothetical person would obviously be using more than one hand or part of their body. Their hand merely represents their involvement in the project.

One example of an individual synecdoche in Wuthering Heights appears in chapter one. When entering Wuthering Heights for the first time, Lockwood is informed that the family sitting room is simply called "the house" by the residents and servants. In this case, the synecdoche is the sitting room standing for the entirety of the house itself (probably because it is a more social space than the kitchens or bed chambers).

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An example of an individual synecdoche is the following, used by Mr. Lockwood to describe Hareton's entrance into the Wuthering Heights kitchen in the morning. Mr. Lockwood, having had a rough night of it in the dead Catherine's room, is snoozing on a bench near the fire. Rather than say that a person has entered, Lockwood notes:

A more elastic footstep entered next ...

Obviously a "footstep" doesn't enter by itself, and in this case, the footstep stands for an entire human body.

A more interesting and far-reaching use of synecdoche, in my opinion, is the use of "moors" to describe Catherine's love of nature and freedom. Of course, she does love the moors themselves, but they stand more generally for her love of the outdoors and being liberated from the stifling constraints of civilization and patriarchy. One intuitively knows that were Catherine, say, transported to Egypt, she would long to be running by the Nile or in the desert sands. The "moors" are a stand-in for the nature/civilization contrast on which the novel draws.

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A synecdoche is a figure of speech in which a part is used to stand for a whole (or sometimes, a whole is used to stand for a part). The following sentence from Wuthering Heights contains a synecdoche: "Mr. Heathcliff may have entirely dissimilar reasons for keeping his hand out of the way when he meets a would-be acquaintance, to those which actuate me." Mr. Lockwood, Heathcliff's tenant, says this about Heathcliff in Chapter 1 in reference to Mr. Lockwood's own tendency to be shy and retiring. In this example, "hand" is a synecdoche because it is a part that stands for the whole. Heathcliff does not only keep his hand out of the way when he meets people, but instead keeps his whole body out of the way. "Hand" is used to represent his entire self. 

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