Where in the novel does it say that Atticus Finch is a lawyer?

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In the first chapter of the novel, we learn that Atticus broke with the family tradition of living on the land at Finch's Landing. Instead, he studied to become a lawyer, and his brother trained as a doctor. After graduating from law school and passing the bar exam, Atticus moved...

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In the first chapter of the novel, we learn that Atticus broke with the family tradition of living on the land at Finch's Landing. Instead, he studied to become a lawyer, and his brother trained as a doctor. After graduating from law school and passing the bar exam, Atticus moved back to Maycomb, where he began work as a lawyer. We learn too that Atticus has an office in the Maycomb courthouse.

Scout tells us that Atticus makes a decent living as lawyer. He also likes living in Maycomb because he knows everyone there and is related to almost everyone in the town by "blood or marriage."

Scout will later comically complain that Atticus has a less interesting job than most of her classmates' parents, who work in stores, drive trucks, or hold other blue collar jobs, but her readers know that Atticus has a high-status job.

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In the first chapter, Scout gives a detailed description of her family and the town of Maycomb, Alabama. Scout mentions that her father, Atticus, went to Montgomery to "read law." She says, "When my father was admitted to the bar, he returned to Maycomb and began his practice" (Lee 5). Scout goes on to comment that Atticus' first two clients were hanged in the Maycomb County jail after refusing to plead guilty to second-degree murder. She also mentions that Atticus' first experience in the courtroom was the beginning of his distaste for the practice of criminal law. Atticus' occupation as a lawyer is significant to the plot of the novel because he is faced with the difficult task of defending an innocent black man in front of a prejudiced jury. Atticus faces discrimination from his community members for defending Tom Robinson, but follows his conscience and valiantly defends Tom. Despite the fact that Atticus' arguments clearly depict Tom's innocence, the prejudiced jury wrongly convicts Tom because he is a black man.

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