Where and how is diction used in We Should All Be Feminists?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie uses informal diction throughout We Should All Be Feminists. She uses conversational transition words such as “anyway” and emphasizes words (in text, italicized) like those found in the lines “And he would be monitor…While I was full of ambition to do so.” She also employs asides...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie uses informal diction throughout We Should All Be Feminists. She uses conversational transition words such as “anyway” and emphasizes words (in text, italicized) like those found in the lines “And he would be monitor…While I was full of ambition to do so.” She also employs asides in her speech, such as “And men in general are physically stronger. (There are of course many exceptions).” These formatting and word choices aren’t traditionally found in formal writing. Adichie uses informal diction purposefully in this piece because it is meant to be persuasive and emotive. She also guides the reader through personal anecdotes that build up to her position toward the end, which lends itself to a more familiar way of speech. She has the task of relating a world she grew up in to those who may not have a shared understanding of such a culture. To bridge this gap, it is necessary to create a basis for the listener or reader to feel connected to the author or speaker. By avoiding challenging and “high-brow” diction, she is able to make her points and statistics shine through clearly. This creates an environment for them to be easily understood and, thus, for her speech to be more persuasive.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team