To where did revolutions spread in 1830? Were these revolutions successful? Explain.

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In 1830, there were a number of revolutions across Europe, which are referred to as a revolutionary wave. The the two major revolutions, the Belgian Revolution and the July Revolution, are the most prominent, but they also helped usher revolutions in Congress Poland, the Italian states, Portugal, and Switzerland.

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In 1830, there were a number of revolutions across Europe, which are referred to as a revolutionary wave. The the two major revolutions, the Belgian Revolution and the July Revolution, are the most prominent, but they also helped usher revolutions in Congress Poland, the Italian states, Portugal, and Switzerland.

The Belgian Revolution and the July Revolution in France are both classified as romantic nationalist revolutions, in which constitutional monarchies, or popular monarchies, were established.

The July Revolution in France succeeded in overthrowing Charles X, the Bourbon King, and establishing Louis-Philippe as the first “King of the French.” This marked the shift from one constitutional monarchy to another, called the July Monarchy.

A month after the July Revolution, the Belgian Revolution broke out, in which the United Kingdom of the Netherlands allowed the secession of the southern provinces which was called the Kingdom of Belgium. The underlying cause for this revolt was to limit the powers of the absolute monarchy enshrine rights of citizens.

In Portugal, Brazilian liberals expelled Emperor Pedro I from Brazil. In Congress Poland, the November Uprising was not able to gain independence from Russia. In Switzerland, a largely peaceful rebellion forced the cantonal governments to give into demands of assemblies. Finally, in the Italian states, there was a movement to unify into a single nation, which was ultimately squashed by the Austrian army.

Ultimately, these revolutions were about 50% successful in accomplishing their specific goals. However, they were highly important in laying the groundwork for the Revolutions of 1848, which were overwhelming successful in moving European nations closer to democracies.

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The wave of revolutions that swept through Europe in 1830 affected a number of countries. In France, the so-called July Revolution succeeded in overthrowing Charles X, who had ruled the country since the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte. Charles X, of the House of Bourbon, was replaced by his cousin, Louis-Phillipe of Orleans.

Encouraged by the success of the French Revolutionaries, Belgium rebelled against Dutch rule in August. Belgium and the Netherlands had been combined since 1815, something that Belgian nationals had chaffed against. At first, the Belgian revolutionaries had merely advocated for a constitution that would limit the power of the Dutch monarchy over them. When King William I refused any concessions, Belgian radicals began fighting for full independence. After a series of bloody battles, they were able to expel Dutch forces and declared independence on October 4.

That year, there were a number of smaller insurrections in several of the Italian states. Several of the Papal States rose up in the name of Italian unification. Meanwhile, there were revolts in the northern Italian states against Austrian rule. While they did have initial successes, the Austrian army eventually crushed the rebellions throughout Italy the following year.

Poland also attempted a revolution in 1830. At the time, Poland was part of the larger Russian Empire. In November, Polish cadets at a military academy rose up in revolt. The movement quickly caught on and spread throughout Poland. It even spread to parts of Belarus, Ukraine, and Lithuania. However, it ultimately ended in failure when the revolutionary forces were subdued by the much more powerful Russian military.

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There are generally said to have been three revolutions in 1830.  These were in France, Belgium, and Poland.  The first two of these can be called successes, but the Polish revolution cannot really be described in that way.

The revolution in France can be described as a success because it overthrew the monarchy, though it did substitute another king and maintained constitutional monarchy as the French system of government.  The revolution came about because King Charles X was doing things that infringed on what the people saw as their rights.  The king essentially tried to overthrow the government and remake it in a way that would give more power to the monarchy.  This led to popular rebellions that caused Charles to have to abdicate.  Since the revolution got rid of the king and put in a better government, it can be seen as a success.

The revolution in Belgium can also be seen as a success because it led to the establishment of Belgium as an independent country.  Belgium had been merged with Holland in 1815 and Belgians had never really accepted Dutch rule.  Inspired by the revolution in France, the Belgians rebelled.  Their rebellion succeeded and Belgium became independent.

Finally, Poland rebelled against Russia in this year.  Poland had not existed as an independent country since 1795.  It was ruled by Russia in 1830.  The Poles were also inspired by the revolutions in France and Belgium and they tried to rebel against Russia.  Their rebellion was crushed by the Russians and did not lead to an independent country at that time.  Therefore, we cannot say that this rebellion was successful.

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