Where did the title Of Mice and Men come from?  

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Laurine Herzog eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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John Steinbeck took the title of the book from a poem by Robert Burns. The poem is called "To A Mouse (on turning her up in her nest with the plough)" and was written in 1785. The poem is about how we should be tolerant of and appreciate all forms of life, no matter how big or small. Steinbeck's novel carries a similar message, and thus it is fitting that Steinbeck took the title from Burns's poem.

It's also significant that Burns's poem is addressed to the mouse. From the perspective of a human, a mouse may appear insignificant, but in the poem, the mouse is prioritized as the central figure and is the central concern of the speaker. In Of Mice and Men , the smaller, seemingly insignificant characters, namely the outsiders, are also prioritized. It is thus appropriate that Steinbeck took his title from...

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Yojana_Thapa | Student

The title comes from a poem "To a Mouse" by Robert Frost where the author sympathizes to a mouse for destroying it's home. The poem talks about how technology has made mankind powerful.

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