Where did Estragon spend the night?

In Waiting for Godot, it is revealed that Estragon spent the night in a ditch.

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In Waiting for Godot, Estragon reveals that he spent the night in a ditch. However, the audience is not told why he did so.

The audience may get the idea that there is a double meaning to Estragon's words. After all, the word "ditch" can also mean "throwing away"...

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In Waiting for Godot, Estragon reveals that he spent the night in a ditch. However, the audience is not told why he did so.

The audience may get the idea that there is a double meaning to Estragon's words. After all, the word "ditch" can also mean "throwing away" or "discarding" something. In the play, we learn that Estragon is beaten at least twice.

The identities of those who carry out the beatings are never revealed. However, during both beatings, Estragon is bereft of Vladimir's help. Even though Vladimir says that he cares about Estragon, he is never around when Estragon needs him. Instead, Vladimir "ditches" Estragon and leaves the latter to his own defense.

The two companions also have trouble agreeing on anything. It seems that both are in the habit of "ditching" reason whenever they converse.

As an example, when Vladimir tells Estragon that they are to wait for Godot by a particular tree, both men argue about whether the "tree" is a bush or shrub. Estragon maintains that the tree is more like a bush. In answer, Vladimir demands to know what Estragon is insinuating by his insistence that the "tree" is a bush.

However, Estragon doesn't answer. He immediately insists that Godot should already have been present. Meanwhile, Vladimir admits that he doesn't know for sure whether Godot will come. Upon hearing this, Estragon demands to know what will happen if Godot never shows up.

Interestingly, after agreeing with Estragon that they would keep coming back to wait for Godot, Vladimir accuses Estragon of being "merciless." The accusation makes no sense. However, it does reinforce the two men's habit of "ditching" reason during their conversations. The fact that Estragon spends his nights in a ditch can thus be interpreted as symbolic.

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