Where does Bob Ewell say he hates black people in To Kill a Mockingbird?  

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Bob Ewell doesn't have to explicitly state this as his actions make his hatred clear. First, he has brought false charges against Tom Robinson (who is proven innocent by Atticus although not by the court) claiming Tom has raped his daughter, Mayella. Tom's only crime was stopping to help a...

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Bob Ewell doesn't have to explicitly state this as his actions make his hatred clear. First, he has brought false charges against Tom Robinson (who is proven innocent by Atticus although not by the court) claiming Tom has raped his daughter, Mayella. Tom's only crime was stopping to help a girl in need, but Bob is a racist man who wants Tom punished for daring to assist a white person.

Bob yells racial slurs about Tom in the courtroom and when he is questioned about going to get help for Mayella on the night in question, he comments,

“Why, I run for Tate quick as I could. I knowed who it was, all right, lived down yonder in that n*****-nest, passe the house every day. Jedge, I've asked this county for fifteen year to clean out that nest down yonder, they're dangerous to live around 'sides devaluin' my property—“

These are perhaps the most racist remarks Bob makes on the stand. The "they" in question is Tom's family, whom Bob (a man who cannot even provide adequate shelter and food for his own children) claims is "devaluing" his own property. To claim that the presence of any race of people lessens one's property value simply by existing in the same area reveals a heart of hatred. This is also evident in his use of the word "nest" to describe Tom's house and property, associating Tom with an animal. He claims Tom and his family are "dangerous," though there is absolutely no evidence that they have been anything but kind and compassionate to a young, neglected girl—who just happens to be Bob's daughter.

Bob has instructed his daughter in racial hatred well, as she lies on the stand about Tom, just like her father. Bob's heart is full of hate and evil intentions, and much of this spills over onto an innocent man.

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Bob Ewell does not overtly comment that he hates black people in the story but there is more than enough evidence to prove that he is a racist individual, who is prejudiced against black people. Bob Ewell uses racial slurs multiple times in the novel and his conduct toward Tom and Helen Robinson emphasizes his racist personality. While Bob Ewell is on the witness stand in chapter 17, he uses a racial slur by saying, "—I seen that black nigger yonder ruttin’ on my Mayella!" (Lee, 175). Bob Ewell once again refers to Tom Robinson as a "nigger" before he leaves the witness stand. Later on, Bob confronts Atticus Finch outside of the post office and reveals his racist personality by calling Atticus a "nigger-lovin‘ bastard."

In chapter 27, Scout recalls several strange events that involved Bob Ewell and mentions that he threatened and intimidated Helen Robinson. Apparently, Bob Ewell followed Helen Robinson to work and crooned "foul words" at her in an attempt to frighten and disturb her. In addition to using racial slurs on multiple occasions, Bob Ewell demonstrates his hatred towards black people by falsely accusing Tom Robinson of assaulting and raping his daughter. Despite never directly commenting on his hatred of black people, Bob Ewell illustrates his racist personality by continually using racial slurs and mercilessly harming the Robinsons.

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Often the diction of people indicates their feelings, rather than any overt declaration. Such is the case with Bob Ewell.

When he is on the witness stand in Chapter 17, Ewell claims that he heard his daughter screaming and he ran to the window of his house only to discover "that black nigger yonder ruttin' on my Mayella." Here, Ewell's use of a most pejorative term indicates his attitude toward African Americans. Certainly, the black people in the balcony recognize the hateful use of a degrading term from Ewell as "there was an angry muffled groan from the colored people," Scout narrates.

Then, in Chapter 23, as Atticus was leaving the post office, Bob Ewell spits in his face. When Atticus wipes his face with his handkerchief, Ewell asks, "Too proud to fight, you nigger-lovin' bastard?" but Atticus answers, "No, too old." Here Ewell's diction and its implication suggest that there is something terribly wrong with Atticus for wanting to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, whom Ewell has made the scapegoat for his daughter's behavior of which he disapproves.

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