Where did Amir and Baba go when they left Afghanistan in The Kite Runner?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In 1979, five years after the incident at the kite tournament, Afghanistan finds itself in the grip of Soviet military intervention. Baba and Amir leave Kabul in the middle of the night. After a grueling journey with other strangers in the covered cab of an old truck, they reach Jalalabad. From there, they ride in the tank of an oil truck to reach Peshawar, Pakistan.

Baba and Amir book a flight from Pakistan to the United States. There, they settle in a run-down apartment in Fremont, California. Amir graduates high school and moves on to study writing in college while Baba works at a gas station. Baba and Amir spend every Sunday making extra money by selling used items at a flea market in San Jose.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Baba and Amir escaped from Russian-held Kabul in the middle of the night, leaving virtually all of Baba's riches behind. They were joined by "about a dozen" other escaping strangers "in the tarpaulin-covered cab of an old Russian truck." Their eventual destination was Pakistan, but first there would be necessary stops in Afghanistan: The first stop would be Mahipar Falls, where Baba would save one of the passengers from being raped by a Russian soldier. Then it was on to Jalalabad, 170 kilometers from Kabul, where the passengers were forced to wait for several days until their transportation arrived. From Jalalabad, they were transported in the tank of an old oil truck before finally reaching Peshawar, Pakistan. Baba and Amir would eventually fly to the United States, where the two settled in Fremont, California, not far from San Jose.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
Soaring plane image

We’ll help your grades soar

Start your 48-hour free trial and unlock all the summaries, Q&A, and analyses you need to get better grades now.

  • 30,000+ book summaries
  • 20% study tools discount
  • Ad-free content
  • PDF downloads
  • 300,000+ answers
  • 5-star customer support
Start your 48-Hour Free Trial