When the narrator stated that Maniac Magee was "blind," what did this metaphor mean? Was he literally blind? Use text evidence to answer the question.

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No, the narrator does not mean that Maniac is literally blind in the sense that something prevents light waves entering his eye properly and sending a signal to his brain. Maniac sees form, depth, and motion just fine.

Maniac Magee was blind. Sort of. Oh, he could see objects, all...

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No, the narrator does not mean that Maniac is literally blind in the sense that something prevents light waves entering his eye properly and sending a signal to his brain. Maniac sees form, depth, and motion just fine.

Maniac Magee was blind. Sort of. Oh, he could see objects, all right. He could see a flying football or a John McNab fastball better than anybody.

He could see Mars Bar's foot sticking out, trying to trip him up as he circled the bases for a home run.

He could see Mars Bar charging from behind to tackle him, even when he didn't have the football.

He could see Mars Bar's bike veering for a nearby puddle to splash water on him.

He's not colorblind either in the sense that the cones in his retina are misinterpreting wavelengths of light. Maniac is metaphorically colorblind when it comes to issues of race.

When you think about it, it's amazing all the stuff he didn't see.

Such as, big kids don't like little kids showing them up.

[...]

Or a kid who's another color.

Maniac doesn't understand how people can make judgments about other people based on skin color. It's not that Maniac has a higher moral worldview either. He literally doesn't see people as white or black. He doesn't consider his skin white, because his skin is definitely not the color of the whites of his eyes. He also knows that his own skin has at least seven different shades of a color he wouldn't call white, and he uses this same logic with other people's skin color. They all have different shades all over their bodies, and he doesn't see what the big deal is. Maniac treats people like the people they are. He's completely blind to even thinking about treating somebody poorly because their skin color is a different shade.

Maniac kept trying, but he still couldn't see it, this color business. He didn't figure he was white any more than the East Enders were black. He looked himself over pretty hard and came up with at least seven different shades and colors right on his own skin, not one of them being what he would call white (except for his eyeballs, which weren't any whiter than the eyeballs of the kids in the East End).

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