When does "The Tell-Tale Heart" take place?

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While Poe doesn't specify a time period and many of his stories seem to be set in an earlier era, clues in the story suggest it takes places in the 1830s or 1840s, in Poe's lifetime.

The story seemingly takes place in an ordinary American home of the period, not...

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While Poe doesn't specify a time period and many of his stories seem to be set in an earlier era, clues in the story suggest it takes places in the 1830s or 1840s, in Poe's lifetime.

The story seemingly takes place in an ordinary American home of the period, not a castle or catacomb or exotic setting. There is no electric lighting: the narrator checks on the old man at night by taking a lantern into his room. He buries him under wood floorboards rather than stones, as might be the case in an earlier time or in Europe.

The narrator seems to live on an average street, not isolated. We know this because the police come to the "street door" in response to a neighbor having heard worrisome noises the night before.

That there is a paid police force would also indicate a nineteenth century setting.

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"The Tell-Tale Heart" is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. It is uncertain in which time period the story takes place, though it may very well be the time period in which it was written (the story was published in 1843). The story takes place in a house, where the narrator lives during the action of the plot. Additionally, the story takes place wherever it is enunciated — in other words, wherever the narrator is when he or she is telling it, which may likely be prison or a mental institution. The story details the narrator's murder of an old man with whom he lives. The narrator murders him because of his obsession with and repulsion from the old man's grotesque "vulture-like" eye. After murdering the old man and hiding his body under the floorboards, the narrator begins to hear (or hallucinate) the beating of the old man's heart. When police come to question him about the old man's disappearance, the narrator's guilt (and terror at the beating of the heart, which grows louder and louder) reaches a fever pitch and he confesses. 

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