When Montresor says he was so glad to see Fortunato that “[He] thought [he] should never have done wringing his hand,” Poe is using what kind of literary device?

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Montresor, the narrator, has already outlined his rather intense criteria for successful revenge. He has also named his enemy, Fortunato, as one who has harmed him and insulted him in so many ways. He's even said that he can now smile at his enemy because he is imagining the man's "immolation"—complete and utter destruction. However, Montresor has not told us exactly how he plans to achieve this destruction, and so when he seems so happy to run into his enemy, we might be somewhat surprised. He says,

I was so pleased to see [Fortunato] that I thought I should never have done wringing his hand.

When what happens in reality differs from our expectations, irony is created, and, therefore, it is ironic when Montresor seems so glad to see Fortunato, the man we know that he hates. We later learn that this is all a part of his plan to achieve his revenge.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," by Edgar Allen Poe, the author is using hyperbole in the quote, "I was so pleased to see him, that I thought I should never have done wringing his hand."

Poe is essentially saying, "I was so happy to see him that I though I would just keep shaking his hand forever!"

Hyperbole is the use of exaggeration to make a point. The exaggeration here is that he could shake someone's hand forever, when it probably just ended up being a normal handshake.

Poe is making the point that Montresor is incredibly glad to see Fortunato. This is not because they are friends, or love to spend time with one another, but because Montresor is plotting revenge upon Fortunato and is glad to happen upon him just as he is ready to begin to enact his revenge plan.

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