When Mercutio says, "A plague o' both your houses!" (3.1.106),  he is referring to what?

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When Mercutio says "A plague o' both your houses!" (3.1.106), he is referring to the feud between the Montagues and the Capulets.  In other words, he wishes both the Montagues and the Capulets ill will.  The reason why Mercutio has such anger is found in his next line:  "They have made worms' meat of me" (3.1.107).  This horrid feud between the Montagues and the Capulets has caused Mercutio's mortal wound.  Ironically, Mercutio doesn't only blame Tybalt for the fray.  Even in his great pain and mortality, Mercutio sees the bigger picture here.  If it weren't for the feud, Mercutio would not have found himself to be "a grave man" (3.1.98).

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