When do Juliet and her father argue about Juliet's marrying Paris in Romeo and Juliet?

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The issue of Juliet's marriage to Paris happens in act 3, scene 5. The possibility that the marriage between Juliet and Count Paris was foreshadowed early in the play when Paris came to ask Juliet's father for her hand in marriage. At that time, Juliet's father told him to...

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The issue of Juliet's marriage to Paris happens in act 3, scene 5. The possibility that the marriage between Juliet and Count Paris was foreshadowed early in the play when Paris came to ask Juliet's father for her hand in marriage. At that time, Juliet's father told him to wait. After that event, Juliet met Romeo and married him in secret. Their marriage was consummated, and then Tybalt was murdered. Juliet's father thinks that marrying Paris will help his daughter stop her excessive grieving.

Keep in mind that the family structure during the time of this play was much different than it is today. Noble families often had nannies (in this play, called a nurse) raise their children, and the parents themselves didn't have a lot of interaction with them. It was an era in which children were to be seen, but not so much heard. It was also a time in which children were expected to obey their parents' commands. Arranged marriages were common among nobility for the purpose of social climbing, or simply keeping all the wealth in the family. Noble families married people who were of the same or higher means, but never lower. Romeo was in the same social class as Juliet, but their families were sworn enemies, so a marriage between them would never have been accepted.

The argument about the marriage begins when Lady Capulet breaks the news to Juliet, and Juliet responds with a refusal:

Now, by Saint Peter’s Church and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he, that should be husband, comes to woo.
I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet. And when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed!
Her father is incensed when she refuses. He expects her to be grateful, and proud of the match he's made. He responds to her in a way we would consider verbal abuse now. But at the time, Juliet's refusal was much more outrageous than her father's response. She tells her father:
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate,
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.
She says she's not proud of the match, that she hates Paris, but even still, she's grateful for what her dad tried to do for her since it was done out of love.
The nurse tries to defend Juliet, but Old Capulet chides her, too. He tells Juliet that if she won't marry Paris, she will no longer be Capulet's daughter, as he will kick her out of his house and disown her.
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Juliet and her father argue about her marriage to Count Paris just after her mother informs her of the arrangements her father has made, in Act 3, Scene 5 (and this takes place right after Romeo leaves her bedroom!).  Juliet rejects their plans, insisting that she will not marry Paris.  When her father walks in, her mother says that Juliet should tell him herself.  He is immediately incensed at Juliet's lack of gratitude and pride in their choice of so great a husband.  He calls her "Unworthy" of such an advantageous match (3.5.150).  Even when she begs for his patience, imploring him to listen to her, he threatens to hit her (his "fingers itch"), and says that she can "hang, beg, starve, die in the streets" unless she relents and does as he has ordered (3.5.204).  He promises that he will "not be forsworn" (3.5.207); in other words, he will not change his mind or take back what he has said.  Juliet is absolutely her father's daughter, though, because she is as resolute as he once she's made up her mind.

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