In Lord of the Flies, when Golding refers to the beast from the water, does he mean the beast 666 from the Bible?I made some research about the Bible and found out that one of Jesus' Disciples...

In Lord of the Flies, when Golding refers to the beast from the water, does he mean the beast 666 from the Bible?

I made some research about the Bible and found out that one of Jesus' Disciples (Apostle John) had a vision of a beast that came from the water and somehow symbolized the end of the world....could it be connected to this "Beast from water"?

Asked on by disey348

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Golding definitely employs religious allegory in his novel Lord of the Flies.  His diction in this novel is so painstakingly deliberate, leaving nothing to chance.  The titles of the chapters are all full of meaning and symbolism.  Certainly the title "Beast from the Water" is an allusion to the Beast in the Book of Revelations; one the major themes of the novel deals with man's inherent sinful nature.  The beast in the Bible and the beast in Golding's novel both represent pure evil.  Later, when the Lord of the Flies taunts Simon in the jungle, he reveals that he is the Beast, "the reason why it's no go? Why things are the way they are?" (143).  The name 'Lord of the Flies' is yet another Biblical reference to the devil, translated from the word 'Beelzebub.'  Golding uses these references to the devil to underscore his theme about man's innate inclination toward sin and destruction. 

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