When did Walker's mother show her temper?  

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Alice Walker 's mother reveals her "temper" (though I would call it fierce, loving power) when her white landlord repeatedly suggests that the children should not pursue an education as they will only ever be field workers. Alice's mother displays her love and loyalty to her children when she bravely...

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Alice Walker's mother reveals her "temper" (though I would call it fierce, loving power) when her white landlord repeatedly suggests that the children should not pursue an education as they will only ever be field workers. Alice's mother displays her love and loyalty to her children when she bravely argues against the landlord's racist assertions. Alice remembers her mother as a loving and patient woman, and it is clear that the anger she shows to the landlord is rooted in her fierce love for her children. Alice's mother is angry at the racism that she and her family are forced to endure in their everyday lives. She knows that her children have a better chance of lessening some of the burdens that racism brings if they receive their education. In light of this, she rightly reacts in anger towards her racist landlord when he suggests that they not work towards liberating themselves from their oppression.

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In her essay "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," Alice Walker talks about her mother's resilience in the face of racism and poverty. Walker's mother and father were sharecroppers in Georgia. However, despite their lowly circumstances, Walker's mother expected more for her children and insisted that Alice, particularly, get the education that was not accessible to her.

Mrs. Walker loses her temper when their white landlord dares to say that her children need not progress beyond their status as field hands :

And this is how I came to know my mother: she seemed a large, soft, loving-eyed woman who was rarely impatient in our home. Her quick violent temper was on view only a few times a year, when she battled with the white landlord who had the misfortune to suggest to her that her children did not need to go to school.

Walker's mother is very tender and loving, particularly toward her family. Loving them also requires her to defend them against those who seek to circumscribe their lives. "The white landlord" makes this mistake.

 

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