When did the Separate Amenities Act start?

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The Separate Amenities Act, also commonly called the Reservation of Separate Amendment Act, was passed into law by royal assent on October 5th, 1953, and enforcement began four days later on October 9. This launched nearly four decades of legal segregation in South Africa. However, unofficial segregation practices excluding non-whites...

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The Separate Amenities Act, also commonly called the Reservation of Separate Amendment Act, was passed into law by royal assent on October 5th, 1953, and enforcement began four days later on October 9. This launched nearly four decades of legal segregation in South Africa. However, unofficial segregation practices excluding non-whites from certain public facilities as well as private businesses were in place during the previous decade in many areas. In March of 1960, a number of amendments to the act were added, which further defined the apartheid system.

It was not until 1990 that the Separate Amenities Act was repealed by the South African Parliament, which began the process to end apartheid in the country. However, in certain urban areas such as Cape Town, Durban, and Johannesburg, re-integration had been taking place for years, despite the act's legal status. In 1994, apartheid came to its end in South Africa.

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The Separate Amenities Act (officially the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act) was enacted in South Africa in mid 1953 and given royal assent on October 5, 1953 (at the time, South Africa was still a constitutional monarchy within the British Empire). It had an effective date of October 9, 1953.

The Separate Amenities Act marked the start of legalized segregation on racial lines in South Africa. The act went so far as to establish that not just segregation could be applied, but complete exclusion of certain races from facilities could also be extended.

The Separate Amenities Act was repealed by the South African parliament after the end of apartheid with the enactment of the Discriminatory Legislation regarding Public Amenities Repeal Act. This ordinance came into force in October 1990.

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The Reservation of Separate Amenities Act began in 1953. In South Africa, a white minority had control of the government and wanted to stay in power. The Reservation of Separate Amenities Act separated the blacks from the whites. Segregation was found in many places including restaurants, buses, hotels, theaters, and bathrooms. Usually, the facilities for the black people were worse than the facilities for the white people. This was part of the system of apartheid that existed in South Africa for many years.

Eventually, international pressure was put on South Africa to end the apartheid system. Some countries refused to trade with South Africa, allow travel to South Africa, or play their teams in various sports. This pressure helped to bring about change in South Africa. The Reservation of Separate Amenities Act ended in 1990. Apartheid ended in 1994.

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I assume that this is a question about South Africa.  If so, the Separate Amenities Act (more properly known as the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act) was passed in 1953.  Thus, we can say that it started in that year.

The Separate Amenities Act was part of the South African system of apartheid.  The point of this act was to ensure that whites and non-whites would be kept separate from one another in public accommodations.  Segregation had existed to a great degree even before this act was passed.  However, the official law of the land at that time was “separate but equal,” just as it was in the United States.  Because courts sometimes upheld this standard, the Separate Amenities Act was passed.

The Separate Amenities Act did not just say that all public facilities could be segregated.  It also explicitly stated that the facilities for white people could be better than those for non-whites.  In other words, facilities could be separate and did not have to be equal.  By passing this law in 1953, the South African government took another step in creating the apartheid regime that continued to exist until 1994.

The best answer to your question, then, is 1953.

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