When did the Hitler Youth take place?

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The Hitler Youth, originally called the Jugendbund der NSDAP, was founded by the Nazi Party in Munich in 1922 (Hitler had authorized the creation of a youth division of the National Socialist Workers' Party or NSDAP in 1920). The organization was loosely based on the practices of the Wandervögel, or...

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The Hitler Youth, originally called the Jugendbund der NSDAP, was founded by the Nazi Party in Munich in 1922 (Hitler had authorized the creation of a youth division of the National Socialist Workers' Party or NSDAP in 1920). The organization was loosely based on the practices of the Wandervögel, or Wandering Birds, the German version of the Boy Scouts. This earlier group mainly involved hiking and outdoor activities. 

After the Beer Hall Putsch of 1923, after which Hitler was jailed, the Hitler Youth was disbanded, though it lived on through underground organizations and was reorganized in 1926 under a law student named Kurt Gruber. In 1926, it became the Hitler-Jugend, Bund deutscher Arbeiterjugend (Hitler Youth, League of German Worker Youth).

Though it started with very few members, the Hitler Youth organization had over 100,000 members in 1932 and over two million members in 1933, the year Hitler came to power. The Hitler Youth organization included boys ages 14 to 18, and there was a separate division for boys ages 10 to 14 called Jungvook and a division for girls called the Bund Deutscher Mädel, the League of German Girls, or BDM. In the later years of World War II, Hitler Youth members were called on to dig trenches and defend Germany as Allied forces approached their country. 

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The Hitler Youth was an initiative formed by Adolf Hitler in 1920. Also known as the Nazi Youth League, it did not gain much attention at first, but by 1922, after Hitler was released from prison and resumed his involvement in political activities, it started to attract more members. The League was meant to be a group for young members similar to the National Socialist Worker's Party, and was known for a distinctive mode of dress and grooming (namely short pants and hiking boots).

The official name of "Hitler Youth" was not given to the group until 1926, a name created by one of its first notable leaders, Kurt Gruber. The membership of the group was mainly boys aged fourteen to eighteen. It became a requirement that members over the age of eighteen also had to join the stormtroopers. At one point before the war began, there were more than 300 regiments of Hitler Youth in Germany, with each unit comprising more than six thousand young men. By 1936, when the war was in full swing, the Hitler Youth went from being a movement to being a nationally recognized organization, and membership and training became mandatory. Other youth groups were disallowed. Membership was now encouraged for children as young as ten. By 1939 the Hitler Youth comprised more than seven million young people.

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