When copper and oxygen react, forming copper oxide, do the reactants form a product with different or the same properties?

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When copper and oxygen react to form copper oxide, the product has properties that are different from those of the reactants. There are two types of copper oxide, copper(I)oxide and copper(II)oxide:

`4Cu + O_2-> 2 Cu_2O` (copper(I)oxide)

`2 Cu + O_2-> 2 CuO` (copper(II)oxide)

Copper metal is a red-brown color,...

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When copper and oxygen react to form copper oxide, the product has properties that are different from those of the reactants. There are two types of copper oxide, copper(I)oxide and copper(II)oxide:

`4Cu + O_2-> 2 Cu_2O` (copper(I)oxide)

`2 Cu + O_2-> 2 CuO` (copper(II)oxide)

Copper metal is a red-brown color, as seen on the outer layer of a penny. Like other metals it's ductile, malleable and is a good conductor of electricity and heat.

Oxygen is a reactive non-metal that exists as a colorless gas under normal conditions. Oxygen is an oxidizer and a reactant in combustion.

The two copper oxides that can form are ionic compounds. Copper(I)oxide, also known as cuprous oxide, is red-colored solid that doesn't dissolve in water. Copper(II)oxide, also known as cupric oxide, is a black solid that is also insoluble in water. Both oxides are poor thermal and electrical conductors.

Whenever a chemical reaction takes place new substances form with different chemical formulas and different properties from the reactants.

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