When considering a person who has had a stroke explore the psycho-social dimensions of the condition in great detail. Discuss lifestyle, social roles,vocational roles, psychological perspective and...

When considering a person who has had a stroke explore the psycho-social dimensions of the condition in great detail. Discuss lifestyle, social roles,

vocational roles, psychological perspective and misconceptions held by the general pbulic in relationship to a stroke.

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Lorraine Caplan | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There is considerable variability in the aftermath of a stroke or strokes, everything from complete recovery to a permanent, vegetative state.  For those in between somewhere, there are many implications for the patient. 

The psychological perspective of the patient varies, too, depending on his or her psychological makeup, the kind of support the patient has, and the severity of the stroke.  Some people seem to give up, while others are determined to overcome limitations and rehabilitate themselves completely.  It can be very hard work to recover, but a good physical therapist, a good occupational therapist, and a good therapist can make a world of difference.  The attitude of one's family and friends matters a great deal, too.  A family that makes things too easy for the stroke victim is really hindering recovery. 

Employers can be wary of welcoming a stroke victim back to work, with concerns about the potential for further strokes, liability, and whether or not the employee can properly do the job.  I would have to say there is some prejudice in this area.  However, there are laws, for example the Americans with Disabilities Act, which a person can rely on to make a case for a return to employment.

I would have to say there is also a kind of prejudice on the part of the general public regarding strokes, most of which is founded in ignorance.  A person who has difficulties with speech, for example, may have to deal with the impatience of others.  A person who has had a stroke that effects movement and appearance sometimes has to put up with stares.  People will assume that the stroke victim is somehow cognitively impaired, which is not necessarily the case, or assume that the person is useless somehow. 

All of these implications are important to bear in mind when dealing with a stroke victim, who needs the support of a team of professionals, who often needs to have his or her family and friends educated on stroke aftermath, and who needs to have some resources to help with employment and the general public.  It's good to see a question that considers aspects other than the physical in the consideration of stroke. 

 

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