When Athena departs from Telemachus and Nestor, how does she reveal that she is a goddess?

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In book 3 of The Odyssey, Athena shape-shifts from Mentor, a seeming mortal, into an eagle, right in front of Telemachus, the old king Nestor, and the Achaeans. As Athena flies away, the king is astonished, and Telemachus's status is suddenly elevated. The fact that a young person like Telemachus has the personal protection of Athena means he is a truly special prince worthy of particularly special treatment.

Immediately after Athena's exit, King Nestor and the rest of the Achaeans realize that Mentor was actually the goddess in disguise. As Mentor accompanied Telemachus during their arrival to King Nestor's banquet, the king realizes that the goddess had been there all along. The king summons his queen to begin preparations to honor Athena with a ceremony, as he feels honored to have had the presence of the goddess at one of his own feasts.

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After Nestor, the King of Pylos, invites Telemachus to stay in his palace in Book Three, Athena, disguised as Mentor, tells Nestor and Telemachus that she will go back to the ship. Then, "With that the bright-eyed goddess winged away/in an eagle's form and flight" (lines 415-416; Fagles translation). In other words, she turns into an eagle and flies away in front of Nestor and Telemachus. Nestor seizes Telemachus's hand and tells him that he, Telemachus, will never be a coward or "defenseless" because he is protected by the gods. Nestor immediately knows that Mentor was really Athena, and he makes a sacrifice to her right away, as mortals are supposed to do. The next day, Nestor orders the slaughter of a heifer, and he summons a goldsmith to coat the heifer's horns in gold. He then makes a sacrifice to Athena, who attends the ritual. 

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