What's wrong with the marriage of Nora and Torvald in A Doll's House?

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The primary issue with Nora and Torvald 's marriage concerns the fact that it is not based on equality and honesty but is instead founded on deception and control. Although Torvald is a responsible husband and father, he lacks respect for his wife and views her as his possession. Torvald...

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The primary issue with Nora and Torvald's marriage concerns the fact that it is not based on equality and honesty but is instead founded on deception and control. Although Torvald is a responsible husband and father, he lacks respect for his wife and views her as his possession. Torvald does not treat Nora as his intellectual equal and continually refers to her using pet names like "squirrel," "lark," and "featherbrain." Torvald also believes that Nora would be lost without him and views himself as her guardian and protector. He is extremely demeaning towards Nora and controls nearly every aspect of her life.

Towards the beginning of the play, Nora is content playing the role of "doll" in Torvald's home and is primarily focused on pleasing him. She does not desire independence and simply wishes to pay off her debt to Krogstad in order to avoid conflict with her husband.

Nora also harbors a secret from her husband by hiding the fact that she committed forgery to borrow the money that saved his life. She is forced to save every bit of money she can and work menial jobs in order to pay her debts. Between Torvald's oppressive, objectionable treatment of Nora and her deceitfulness, the Helmer marriage is in jeopardy. Unlike Kristine Linde and Nils Krogstad's relationship, which is founded on equality, dependance, and honesty, Nora and Torvald's relationship abruptly ends after Nora experiences a dramatic transformation after discovering that Torvald never genuinely loved her.

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Nora and Torvald have a shallow marriage.  It is based on possessive love.  Torvald believes Nora is his prize possession. He does not deem her his equal.  She is his play toy.  He believes he is intellectually superior to Nora.  He does not have a clue about what she really knows.  He is programmed by society which keeps the humble little woman at a man's feet, not by his side.

Nora plays along with Torvald and pretends to be just as shallow as he is.  She takes on the part he has given her.  She is his little squirrel or little songbird.  Nora is an intellectual who has to keep her knowledge undercover.  She truly loves Torvald enough to sacrfice her reputation by secretly borrowing money for his health issues.  In return, he shouts at her and sends her to her room. She is his child, not his equal.  Torvald worries about appearances.  He is all about keeping up with the Jones.  He worries about his reputation and will not sacrifice, not even for the woman he loves.

Nora on the other hand is willing to do whatever she must do for the man she loves.  If only Torvald had appreciated her true love, perhaps they would still be together.  Nora has no choice. She must leave Torvald to find out more about herself.

Torvald had it all.  He had a woman who truly loved him enough to sacrifice her own feelings in order to make him happy. That is why she played his silly games.  It is too bad that Torvald was blinded by his own ambition.  Will Nora return to him is the question with which he is left wondering? I would guess that he has lost her forever.

 

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Nora and Torvald have a shallow marriage.  It is based on possessive love.  Torvald believes Nora is his prize possession. He does not deem her his equal.  She is his play toy.  He believes he is intellectually superior to Nora.  He does not have a clue about what she really knows.  He is programmed by society which keeps the humble little women at a man's feet, not by his side.

Nora plays along with Torvald and pretends to be just as shallow as he is.  She takes on the part he has given her.  She is his little squirrel or little songbird.  Nora is an intellectual who has to keep her knowledge undercover.  She truly loves Torvald enough to sacrfice her reputation by secretly borrowing money for his health issues.  In return, he shouts at her and sends her to her room. She is his child, not his equal.  Torvald worries about appearances.  He is all about keeping up with the Jones.  He worries about his reputation and will not sacrifice, not even for the woman he loves.

Nora on the other hand is willing to do whatever she must do for the man she loves.  If only Torvald had appreciated her true love, perhaps they would still be together.  Nora has no choice. She must leave Torvald to find out more about herself.

Torvald had it all.  He had a woman who truly loved him enough to sacrifice her own feelings in order to make him happy. That is why she played his silly games.  It is too bad that Torvald was blinded by his own ambition.  Will Nora return to him is the question with which he is left wondering? I would guess that he has lost her forever.

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It seems like there is little right in their marriage.  From the most fundamental of standpoints, their marriage is in trouble because there is not an open and honest validation of voice and exchange of opinions.  Torvald is convinced of his own voice as being the sole voice of perfection.  This contributes to his stifling manner of Nora.  For her part, Nora believes that Torvald's "rules" and manner is appropriate, and she plays along with it.  The fact that she lies and has to sneak about demonstrates that she really believes that Torvald's point of view regarding their marriage is the right one.  In this, one sees how their marriage is a frail and weak one.  The surface might reflect something different, but the core of it is a weakened one.  When Nora comes to the realization that the marriage is one that is stifling her own voice, she recognizes this and leaves, as opposed to opening a constructive and transformative dialogue with Torvald.  It is in this where one sees how their marriage truly is fraught with problems and challenges, as opposed to promises and possibilities.

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