What's the style of "The Pedestrian"?

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sciftw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I believe that your question is referring to the four types of style that writers generally choose from.  The four writing style types are narrative, persuasive, expository, and descriptive.  

Of the four listed writing styles, "The Pedestrian" would be the narrative style.  That style is common for short stories and novels, so it makes sense that Bradbury would use it for this story.  One item that is common to the narrative style is that the story has a person telling the story.  It could be a first, second, or third person narrator, and "The Pedestrian" makes use of the third person narrator.  Another common element of the narrative style is the use of dialogue sequences.  "The Pedestrian" also has that.  There are not many characters that converse in the story, but the dialogue sequence between Mr. Mead and the police car is quite lengthy.  One other characteristic of the narrative style is that conflict is usually central to the story.  That is true of Bradbury's story again.  There isn't any physical fighting in the story, but the conflict is between Mr. Mead and the police car.  On a larger scale, Mr. Mead's conflict is with the society that he lives in.  

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