What's a quote from the play The Crucible that shows how Abigail was selfish and how does it show it?

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In Act 1, Betty has momentarily awoken from her coma-like state. When they have some time alone, Abigail starts talking to Mary Warren, Betty, and Mercy Lewis about the accusations of dancing in the forest with Tituba and possible witchcraft. They don't know whether they should tell the truth or...

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In Act 1, Betty has momentarily awoken from her coma-like state. When they have some time alone, Abigail starts talking to Mary Warren, Betty, and Mercy Lewis about the accusations of dancing in the forest with Tituba and possible witchcraft. They don't know whether they should tell the truth or lie about what really happened. When they allude to telling the truth, Abigail responds with,

"Now look you. All of you. We danced. And Tituba conjured Ruth Putnam's dead sisters. And that is all. And mark this. Let either of you breathe a word, or the edge of a word, about the other things, and I will come to you in the black of some terrible night and I will bring a pointy reckoning that will shudder you. And you know I can do it; I saw Indians smash my dear parents' heads on the pillow next to mine, and I have seen some reddish work done at night, and I can make you wish you had never seen the sun go down!"

Abigail's threat of violence is the ultimate form of selfishness. She is not thinking about anyone but herself. Her selfishness engulfs her and causes her to only think of how she can get out of this situation without any punishment. Abigail is driven by her infatuation with John Proctor and her obsession with wanting a life with him.

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In Act One, Abigail and John Proctor are alone together (with the near-unconscious Betty Parris) for a few minutes, and it gives us an opportunity to see what really motivates her: her own selfish desire to possess him.  When Abigail insults John's wife, Elizabeth, for turning her out, he threatens to whip her if she continues.  In tears, she cries,

I look for John Proctor that took me from my sleep and put knowledge in my heart!  I never knew what pretense Salem was, I never knew the lying lessons I was taught by all these Christian women and their covenanted men!  And now you bid me tear the light out of my eyes?  I will not, I cannot!  You loved me, John Proctor, and whatever sin it is, you love me yet!

Betty has already said that, in addition to dancing in the woods and conjuring Ruth Putnam's dead sisters, Abigail "drank a charm to kill John Proctor's wife!"  In the above quotation from Abigail, we see why: they have had a carnal relationship, and she longs to be with him again.  She says that he taught her about the hypocrisy in Salem; she feels that he woke her up, in a manner of speaking, and now she can't unlearn the things she's learned from him.  As a result, Abigail proceeds to maliciously accuse and frame Elizabeth Proctor for witchcraft because she wants to take her place with John. 

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