The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe

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What's the point of view in "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe?

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Poe uses a first person objective narrator, a man called Montresor, to narrate this story. We can tell that it is a first person narrator because he uses the pronoun "I" and is a participant in the events that take place. We can tell that it is an objective telling because the events have already been concluded, and Montresor is telling the story after the fact; note that the verbs are past tense: he "had borne" Fortunato's insults, he isn't "bearing" them currently. A first person objective narrator can be more reliable than a subjective narrator because they have already lived through whatever events they describe; people in the midst of action are often emotional and have not had time to reflect on the situation.

An objective narrator, however—at least in first person (it is different for third person)—knows how things work out. They know the end, and so they can be more measured and accurate in their narration. In the final paragraph of the story, Montresor actually says that no...

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