What is the plot of "Thank You, M'am"?for 10 marks so long answer please! thank you original question: Create a plot line for the story indicating the introduction, rising action, climax, falling...

What is the plot of "Thank You, M'am"?

for 10 marks so long answer please! thank you

original question:

Create a plot line for the story indicating the introduction, rising action, climax, falling action and resolution. What type of conflict is the plot based on? Explain your choice.

ps. Sorry, the question has bad grammar because I'm only allowed 150 characters.

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hilahmarca | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

The short story "Thank You, M'am" opens with Roger, a poor teenage boy, who tries to steal Mrs. Jones' purse while she walks home at night. That would be the introdiction, or exposition of the plot. The story's plot mounts with the rising action of Mrs. Jones, an unusually strong woman for her age, catching Roger as he tries to steal the purse. When she finds out he has no home, she drags him home with her. The climax of the story occurs when Mrs. Jones purposely leaves Roger alone in her room with her purse while she goes to fix him something to eat. Will Roger attempt to steal the purse again or not? That is the tense moment in the story. Roger purposely sits on the side of the bed where Mrs. Jones can see him. He wants her to see that he's not attempting to steal the purse. This shows that he is a dynamic character who is already changing his ways. He wants Mrs. Jones to trust him whereas in the beginning of the story, he didn't care about that. The falling action occurs when Mrs. Jones and Roger eat their food and are about to say good-bye to each other. Finally, the resolution occurs when Mrs. Jones gives Roger the money for the blue-suede shoes he wants, which was his motive for trying to steal Mrs. Jones' purse in the first place. The resolution occurs when Roger thanks Mrs. Jones and she promptly shuts the door. They never see each other again.

 

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