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Bret Harte's short story "The Luck of Roaring Camp" has a plot that rises steadily to a climax that occurs very close to the end of the story, followed by a brief denouement . The inciting incident is the birth of a child to Cherokee Sal, the...

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Bret Harte's short story "The Luck of Roaring Camp" has a plot that rises steadily to a climax that occurs very close to the end of the story, followed by a brief denouement. The inciting incident is the birth of a child to Cherokee Sal, the lone woman at the camp, a prostitute, who immediately dies. The child, then, is left to be raised by a group of very rough men, most of whom have no experience with babies or children. However, the men are determined to give the child a good upbringing, and they make arrangements for feeding him, caring for him, and naming him. They take up a collection, and everyone attends his christening, where they name him Thomas, but he is mainly known as "The Luck." The child has an amazing impact on the men; they immediately start to improve themselves and their environment for his sake. They bathe more frequently, stop shouting and yelling, and sing nicer songs. They begin to appreciate the beauty of nature. The child thrives, and the camp prospers. Unfortunately, the winter is a harsh one, and a severe flood occurs. The house the baby lived in was washed away and the baby is missing. In the climax of the story, the baby's body is discovered in the arms of Kentuck, a man who had been one of The Luck's primary caregivers. The denouement is just a few sentences long. Kentuck dies with the words, "He's a-taking me with him. Tell the boys I've got the Luck with me now." 

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