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I think that this is going to be completely dependent on individual taste and perception.  I would also suggest that determining this is also going to be dependent on social group and that collectivity's views and perceptions.  For example, groups that value sports will deem one particular set of ideas...

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I think that this is going to be completely dependent on individual taste and perception.  I would also suggest that determining this is also going to be dependent on social group and that collectivity's views and perceptions.  For example, groups that value sports will deem one particular set of ideas as "cool" while a group that values the arts will deem another set as "cool."  Each grouping has their own set of intangible criteria that defines the sense of cool or the accepted notion of good.  It is nearly impossible to find a universally accepted standard of cool.  The paradox might be that one might be better set to find a universally accepted understanding of what is not cool.  For instance, government might not be seen as "cool" with a sense of cynicism towards institutions.  Other "uncool" items might be authority figures, parents, and (sad as it is to say for me), teachers.

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