What is the form of the following poem?there are many lines you have not traced on my palms still you think you know me , when i speak you nod knowingly as if you've read my mind and are only...

What is the form of the following poem?

there are many lines you have not traced on my palms still you think you know me , when i speak you nod knowingly as if you've read my mind and are only politely acknowledging the confirmation of my spoken words but you cannot possibly know what i've been contemplating these days my head is full of blood but you show no fear and i do not trust my hands which feel to me like stones you do not cower when i approach though i am like a runaway train and i can hear you voice cool and steady while my brain screams profanities into the air around your ears , our past had given you no reason to be afraid but still i am surprised you cannot see the danger burning brightly in my eyes the fire i am struggling to control as i sit stewing in the kitchen's false light with tears my daughter comes to me frightened by what she cannot see afraid tonight to sleep i hold her in my arms singing soft words of comfort feeling her heart quickly beating against my chest knowing before i can think that i have forgotten us for our stupid little war knowing in the incandescent light that anger will never move me as delicately as she has moved me this night thanksss

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jmj616 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Although this poem is written in a very free, unstructured style, it does use some of the standard devices of poetry.

a) Allliteration (the repetition of beginning consonant sounds): nod knowingly,  still i am surprised you cannot see, burning brightly, sit stewing, (find a couple more yourself!)

b) Simile (comparing two things, using the words like or as):  my hands which feel to me like stones, i am like a runaway train,

c) Metaphor (comparing two things without  using the words like or as): 

     *  "the danger burning brightly in my eyes" (danger cannot burn; the poet means that the danger is like a fire that is burning brightly

     * "i sit stewing" (this means that the poet was heated with emotion like somthing that is stewing --unless it means that the poet was being cooked by cannibals!)     

scarletpimpernel eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The poem is written in free verse (no standard rhyme scheme or meter).  The informal grammatical structure represents a form of stream-of-consciousness technique--essentially the speaker's free-flowing thoughts put on paper.

As far as the lack of capitalization, the poem is similar to e e cummings' poetry, but he focused more on line structure and brevity.