What's Collins saying about society that gives certain rights & opportunities to one group while preventing another group from enjoying the same.By saying "the same" i mean like the same rights...

What's Collins saying about society that gives certain rights & opportunities to one group while preventing another group from enjoying the same.

By saying "the same" i mean like the same rights and opportunities.

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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One of the overall themes of I The Hunger Games, and the trilogy in general, is that people will rise up against tyranny and resist oppression.  Collins wastes no time setting the stage for rebellion in her book.  On page five, while hunting in the woods Katniss mutters "District Twelve.  Where you can starve to death in safety."  Early on the poor conditions of the Seam are established as well as the discontent of the people.  Lack of food, medical care, electricity, and freedom are all introduced within the first ten pages.  In addition, the following elements of rebellion are introduced in those first ten pages: Katniss's sarcasm towards the Capitol, the presence of a black market, corruption of the Peace Makers, Gale's strong stance against the Capitol, the mocking of the Hunger Games, and the thought of Gale and Katniss running away from the government.

Throughout The Hunger Gamesand the trilogy this dichotomy between the Districts and the Capitol is constantly explored, and the end result is the breakdown of the system.  Rebellion against the Capitol happened seventy-four years before the book causing the Hunger Games.  Despite its failure, and an incredibly cruel system of reaping children and forcing them to kill each other as a reminder of the power of the Capitol, the government is unable to quell the rebellious thoughts and actions of its citizens.  Her ultimate commentary is that a system based on the subjugation of one people to benefit another is destined to fail.

 

 

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