What's the ball and stick model for barium carbonate?I am curious if you would use a stick for the bond between the carbonate ion and the Barium cation, since it's ionic and it's formed by...

What's the ball and stick model for barium carbonate?

I am curious if you would use a stick for the bond between the carbonate ion and the Barium cation, since it's ionic and it's formed by electrons' transfer.

Asked on by cdumitru

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bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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Barium carbonate, also known as witherite, is a chemical compound used in rat poison, ceramic glazes, and cement.  It has the molecular formula BaCO3.  The carbonate group could be represented with a "ball and stick" model, but the barium atom has two electrons it very willingly gives up, resulting in an ionic bond to the two singly bound oxygen atoms on the carbonate group.  The model would look something like this:

                -O

 Ba 2+           C = O

                -O

You will have to imagine the single bonds between the carbon and -O atoms. 

Barium carbonate is widely used in the ceramics industry as an ingredient in glazes.  It acts as a flux, a matting and crystallizing agent, and combines with certain coloring oxides to produce unique colors not easily attainable by any other means.  It's use is somewhat controversial since some claim it can leach from the glazes into food and drink, poisoning those who partake from those vessels.

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