what are your thoughts and expressions about the Opera? What you think the popular conceptions are of Opera? .· How your personal prejudices about Opera may have been wrong

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I appreciate opera for what it is--an art form which requires great skill.  My personal taste is not particularly in tune with opera, though I do enjoy it more when subtitles are provided.  Phantom of the Opera is a modern compromise, and I like that one a lot.  This year on "America's Got Talent," an opera singer has made it to the top ten acts, and I'm guessing he will be in the top five, as well.  He is Prince Poppycock, and he has brought opera to the masses.  Last week he sang an operatic rendition of a Queen song, and the crowd erupted.  Between his showmanship, the song, and his voice, the crowd was enthralled.  Opera is no longer just for the elite.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I don't know if my personal prejudices about opera are wrong because I still have those prejudices.

My vision of opera is, first of all, that it is only for rich people -- for people who have more elite tastes.  It is not for people like me who are of middle income and who don't go to wine tastings and modern art exhibits.

Second, my vision of opera is that you can't understand it unless you are a music expert.  I watched a show once about an opera singers' competition and I couldn't tell the difference between the good singers (the ones who won) and the bad one (she said it was the worst she had ever sung).

So, I think these are pretty common conceptions of opera.

It is interesting to note that opera was begun in the streets of Italy by the peasants--not by or for rich people.  "To be Italian is to sing," is often heard in Italy.  Opera is the expression of a people who sing their stories.

In the neighborhoods of the Lower East Side of New York in the twentieth century, the opera was often heard and sung.  These Italian-Americans were hardly the elite, as is commonly known.  Steelworkers in Pennyslyvania listened on Saturday to the opera, as well as other Italian blue-collar workers.  The story-lines were handed down from generation to generation.

While some ethnic groups may find little value in opera, there are others that love it.  Perhaps, then, rather than being a matter of class, the appeal of opera seems more one of cultural background.  For, once upon a time, every Saturday there were children of a blue-collar steelworker and an Italian mother whose parents came to America with only the clothes on their backs who listened to "The Barber of Seville," "Madame Butterfly," "Aida," "Carmen," and all the other famous operas and found magic in the music and the richly, cultured voices of the sopranos and tenors.

 

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I think that opera, like other froms of art, is up for interpretation by each individual. While it is definitely not something that I enjoy, I know that others are quite enthralled by it.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I don't know if my personal prejudices about opera are wrong because I still have those prejudices.

My vision of opera is, first of all, that it is only for rich people -- for people who have more elite tastes.  It is not for people like me who are of middle income and who don't go to wine tastings and modern art exhibits.

Second, my vision of opera is that you can't understand it unless you are a music expert.  I watched a show once about an opera singers' competition and I couldn't tell the difference between the good singers (the ones who won) and the bad one (she said it was the worst she had ever sung).

So, I think these are pretty common conceptions of opera.

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

I have slept through some operas, and it all depends on what language the opera is in. If it is an American opera, people can understand more of it and get much out of it. If it is in Italian, maybe less

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